Smoking Prevalence

Posted on : November 8, 2018 |post in : |Comments Off on Smoking Prevalence |

Smoking prevalence rates for adults in Scotland is provided by both the Scottish Health Survey and the Scottish Household Survey.  As the Scottish Household Survey is conducted annually it tends to be the source that most people use for up-to-date prevalence statistics, as the last Scottish Health Survey was conducted in 2003.

Headline results of the Scottish Household Survey 2006 were made available in June 2007 and they show that:

  • smoking is most common among 25 to 34 year old men (34%) and this is also the age group where there is the largest difference between men and women. Smoking increases among males between the ages of 16-24 and 25-34 but the same patterns is not seen among women
  • smoking is more prevalent in the most deprived areas; 41% compared with 12% in the least deprived areas.  People living in the most deprived areas are also less likely to report that their health is good; 41% in the most deprived areas compared with 64% in the least deprived areas
  • 25% of the Scottish population smoke.

Source: The Scottish Executive 2007. Scotland’s people: headline results from the 2006 Scottish Household Survey: annual report. [online] Available from: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/06/04150044/0  [accessed 12 June 2007]

The last full report:  Scotland’s people: results from the 2005 Scottish Household Survey: annual report. [online] Available from:
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/140387/0034518.pdf [accessed 3 August 2006]

Young People

Smoking prevalence data amongst young people (13 and 15 year olds) in Scotland is collected biannually as part of the Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey (SALSUS).

  • 15% of 15 year olds smoke regularly (at least 1 cigarette a week):  12% of boys and 18% of girls.
  • 4% of 13 year olds smoke regularly: 3% of boys and 5% of girls.
  • There was an increase between 2004 and 2006 in the % reporting that they had never smoked from 39% to 47% in 15 year olds, and from 59% to 69% in 13 year olds.

Where pupils obtain cigarettes

  • 82% of 15 year old regular smokers reported buying cigarettes from a shop.
  • 47% of 13 year old regular smokers reported buying cigarettes from a shop.


Dependence

  • 49% of 15 year old regular smokers and 45% of 13 year old regular smokers reported that they wanted to give up.

Source: BMRB Social Research. 2007. Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey (SALSUS) – National Report 2006. [online]. Available from: http://www.drugmisuse.isdscotland.org/publications/abstracts/salsus_national06.htm
[accessed 11 June 2007]

Pregnant Women

Statistics about the percentage of pregnant women and new mothers in Scotland that smoke, is collected when women are 3 months pregnant and at the first visit of the health visitor, when the baby is about 4 months old.  These statistics are provided annually by NHS Information Services Division.

  • 22.7% of women in Scotland are smoking when they are 3 months pregnant

Socioeconomic Status

Both the Scottish Household Survey and the Scottish Health Survey gather information on socioeconomic status of smokers in Scotland.  The Scottish Health Survey was conducted in 1995, 1998 and 2003 and provides several indicators of socioeconomic status including; socio-economic classification (NS-SEC), household income and the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD). Smoking prevalence by household income quintile is available below:

  • 51% of men and 45% of women in the lowest household income quintile in Scotland smoke
  • 15% of men and 13% of women in the highest household income quintile in Scotland smoke.

Source: The Scottish Executive. 2005. Scottish health survey – 2003 results. [online] Available from: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/11/25145024/50251
[accessed 10 January 2006]

According to the headline results of the Scottish Household Survey 2006:

  • smoking is more prevalent in the most deprived areas; 41% compared with 12% in the least deprived areas.  People living in the most deprived areas are also less likely to report that their health is good; 41% in the most deprived areas compared with 64% in the least deprived areas.

Health Board

The Scottish Health Survey also lists smoking prevalence by Health Board, details of the Boards with the highest and lowest smoking rates are below.

  • 35% of adults in Greater Glasgow are current smokers (highest)
  • 23% of adults in Lothian and Highland are current smokers (lowest)

Source: The Scottish Executive. 2005. Scottish health survey – 2003 results [online] Available from: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/11/25145024/50251
[accessed 10 January 2006]

Lung Cancer

  • In 2005, 2151 men and 1,772 women in Scotland died from lung cancer

Source: General Register Office (Scotland). 2005. Deaths, by sex and cause, Scotland 1994-2004. Cited in: ISD Scotland. 2005. Cancer of the trachae, bronchus and lung: mortality. [online] Available from:
http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/files/cancer_lung_mort_m.xls [accessed 22 September 2005]

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Public opinion

The Scottish Executive commissioned MRUK to conduct a series of opinion surveys preceding and following the implementation of the smoke-free legislation.  The latest survey was conducted in May 2006.

  • 73% of people surveyed in Scotland in May 2006 thought the legislation was successful or very successful

Source: Scottish Executive. 2006. Opinion surveys [online] Clearing the Air Scotland Available from: http://www.clearingtheairscotland.com/research/opinion-survey.html [accessed 12 July 2006]

Fires

Fire statistics are published each year by the UK government and include data on the number of fires started by smokers’ materials.

  • In 2005, just over a third of all accidental dwelling fire deaths in the UK were caused by smokers’ materials (i.e. cigarettes, cigars or pipe tobacco)

Source: Department for Communities and Local Government. 2007. Fire statistics, United Kingdom, 2005 [online] London: Department for Communities and Local Government. Available from:
http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/fire/firestatisticsunitedkingdom [accessed 9 October 2007]

  • Smokers’ materials (i.e. cigarettes, cigars or pipe tobacco) were responsible for 110 deaths and 1,075 non-fatal casualties in accidental dwelling fires in the UK in 2005.

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